markets

venez avec moi à Rungis marché international

July 20th, 2011

venez avec moi
à Rungis marché international

 Rungis (pronounced “run gee”) is the world’s largest fresh food market.  It is an enormous operation and the seemingly effortless and efficient  in and out of fresh, quality food product – be it cherries from France or salmon from Scotland – is beyond comprehension. So what is the world’s largest fresh food market is like? Venez avec moi à Rungis (come with me to Rungis) and I will show you (be warned: there are pictures that may not be suitable for young eyes).

LM

 

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les marchés de poissons

February 22nd, 2011

les marchés de poissons

When you visit a market in France, deciphering vegetables is generally obvious. The appearance, despite the French sign, gives it away.  “Un chou-fleur” which looks a cauliflower, is a cauliflower.

Fish is trickier.  Moreover, there are many fish in France that are not available in the States.  Here are some pointers should you want to purchase fresh fish in a French fish market (or order fish on a menu). Remember that fish (as well as vegetables) is purchased by the kilogram, not the pound.  Approximately 2.2 pounds equal to 1 kilogram. The following describe how the fish is cut or caught:

  • pêche locale” means that the fish was fished locally.
  • de côte means “of the coast.”  For example barbue de côte means that the fish, barbue (brill), was caught right there on the coast.
  • de ligne” means the fish was line-caught.
  • griller”, for example, “saumon à griller”, means that that salmon is good for grilling.
  • sur arêtes” means that the fish has not been filleted and still has its backbone (une arête is a fish bone).
  • joue”  is a cheek.   “Joue de lotte is a monkfish cheek.

  • les filets” is fillets (i.e., les filets de Maquereau” are mackerel fillets)
  • goujonnette” is a long piece of fish (or it can be meat) cut sideways and fried.
  • la darne is a steak of fish as opposed to a fillet (i.e., la darne de saumon is a salmon steak).

The following is list of the most common fish you will find in France in the markets with a short description.

Bonnes courses !

LM

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marchés et tous les bons trucs (markets and all that stuff)

November 2nd, 2010

les marchés de Paris

As early as the 5th century, market life has been a part of Parisian culture.  Originally, all markets were “covered”, meaning they were stationary and had a roof.   However, early in the 20th century many of the covered markets closed and in their place arose open-air markets which could be disassembled at the end of the day.   Today the majority of markets are open-air.

Most markets (open-air and covered) carry organic as well as non-organic products.  There are three markets dedicated solely to organic products in the 6ème, 8ème, and 17ème  arrondissements.  In addition to fresh produce, you can find meat, poultry, seafood, and diary products at the markets.  Most have prepared (hot and cold) items available as for sale, including pâtés, sausages, paëlla, roast chickens, pastas, salads, and more complicated dishes such as tajines and boeuf bourguignon.  The markets vary in size.  Larger markets will carry everything from exotic spices to household items, kitchenware, and clothing.

The markets are named for the street or place upon which they are located. While the days and times vary, you can find a market in every arrondissement.   Covered markets are open every day except Monday and close early on Sundays.  They also   close for lunch.  The open-air markets are set up for about 5 to 6 hours.  Many of the markets (open-air and closed) stay open until 7 or 8 p.m.

Below is a list of the Paris markets (minus two) with their locations, days and times.  This list will be continually updated.  However,  if you are planning a trip to Paris, it is best to verify times and days with France Guide (us.franceguide.com) the official site of the French Government Tourist Office before you go as some of the markets’ locations have changed due to tram construction.  When in Paris you can also get a list of the markets from the mayor’s office.

Bonne courses !

LM

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